John Pasciuti | Framingham MA Real Estate | Framingham MA Homes


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A land contract and a mortgage have a number of similarities. For example, you can use either option to purchase a home Both loans must be repaid on a monthly basis.

Understanding the Differences 

A land contract is a legal agreement between a buyer and a seller. Rather than a traditional mortgage scenario with a bank, the seller becomes the lender. The buyer and seller agree on a price for the home then negotiate terms and a payment schedule. 

In many cases, these repayment terms follow a schedule of monthly payments much like a mortgage. However, a balloon payment for the remaining balance is often due within three to five years. At that time, you would then obtain a traditional mortgage to fund the remainder that's due. 

Land Contract Risks

While it can seem like a land contract would be an ideal way to secure a home, it does involve risks you need to know about. A land contract can be a way for you to close on a home if you aren't able to qualify for a mortgage that covers the full cost right away. The three to five years that a typical land contract lasts can give you time to improve your credit and increase your financial soundness. 

Before you agree to a land contract, though, be aware that the property is not yours until you make the final (balloon) payment. This means that if you make any improvements to the property during that time, you could potentially be out of your investment. You are also not building up any equity in the home during the time that the land contract is in effect. 

At any point during the land contract, your position as the buyer could be compromised. For example, the seller is the legal owner of the property until the contract has been fully paid. If they experience financial problems and lose the property, you would have no claim to it and would forfeit your payments. 

As the buyer, you are obligated to meet your payment agreement. If you don't do so at any time during a land contract, the deal ends. The property stays with the seller and you are out the money you've invested. 

Advantages of a Mortgage

With a mortgage, you must pay property taxes and honor your obligations to the lender. As long as you do so -- and avoid liens -- you have legal recognition as the property owner. 

A land contract can seem like an attractive alternative if you don't think you qualify for a traditional mortgage. Before agreeing to one, though, be sure you understand the pitfalls that could be involved. 


We all know that buying a home is expensive. For first-time buyers who don’t have the luxury of equity for a down payment, it can be difficult to find a way to finance your home without taking on a huge interest rate and mortgage insurance.

Fortunately, loan programs like those offered by the U.S. Veterans Affairs can be a godsend. However, there is a great deal of confusion around who is eligible for VA loans and how to acquire them.

So, in today’s post, we’re going to cover some of the frequently asked questions of VA loans. That way, you can feel confident in knowing whether or not it’s a good financing option for you and your family.

VA Loans FAQ

Who is eligible for a VA Loan?

VA loans aren’t just for veterans. Most members of the military, including Reserve and National Guard members can apply. Additionally, spouses of service members who died from a service-related disability and those who died on active duty can apply as well.

How long do you have to service to be eligible?

The VA defines eligibility as having served no less than 90 days of service during wartime and 181 days of continuous service during peacetime.

Who are VA Loans offered by?

Like any other loan, VA loans are offered by private lenders. The difference is that VA loans are guaranteed by the government. That means that the federal government takes on some of the risk of lending to you, therefore making it possible to secure a loan with little or no down payment.

Should I make a down payment on a VA loan?

If you have the means, making a down payment will almost certainly save you money in the long run. If you can put down 10% of your total mortgage amount, you can also significantly reduce the VA Funding Fee.

Will I have to pay private mortgage insurance?

Private mortgage insurance (PMI) is something that borrowers pay on top of their mortgage payments and interest. This additional insurance helps borrowers buy a home with a small down payment. VA loans allow you to secure a mortgage without PMI.

Are VA loans different for active duty, National Guard, and Army Reserve members?

Each type of service member is eligible for a VA loan. However, there are some minor differences regarding the VA Funding Fee. With no down payment, an active duty member would pay 2.15% of the loan amount in fees. National Guard and Army Reserve members pay around 2.40% with no down payment.

What does my credit score need to be to get a VA loan?

The VA doesn’t have a set minimum credit score. However, the private lenders that offer the loan do. On average, the lowest credit score that you can secure a VA loan with is around 620. That being said, a higher score will secure you a lower interest rate, saving you money over the lifetime of your loan.




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